Time for a National Voting Rights Law

The Supreme Court is right, voting rights are threatened throughout the country and national standards are needed for any election involving federal lawmakers.  Voting rights abuses in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Florida and other states reveal widespread attempts to deprive people of the vote.

Voting rights are too important to leave to the whim of state and local governments.

Most commentaries about the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down part of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 focus on its impact in the southern states most directly affected by its provisions.  This tendency will be accelerated by the way Texas, in keeping with their cowboy reputation, is rushing ahead to implement a discriminatory voter ID law that will affect thousands of poor people in that state.  (Mississippi is doing the same thing.)

This, of course, is rank discrimination and must not be allowed to succeed.  The NAACP estimates that one-quarter of African-Americans and 16% of Latinos of voting age do not have a government-issued photo ID.

However, we need to keep in mind that there were widespread attempt to limit access to voting in a number of states during the 2012 election season.  In Florida, Republican officials attempted to shorten the popular early voting period, making it harder for people to chose to vote on the weekend and avoid the burdensome task of waiting in line for many hours on Election Day.  Reportedly, the Republicans were disturbed when they discovered that more than four million people voted before election day in that swing state.

In Ohio, Republican officials tried to get rid of the rules instituted in 2008 that allowed people to vote early by absentee ballot and to vote on the Saturday and Sunday before the traditional Tuesday election day.  When they saw that the new rules encouraged minority and working class voters to show up, their earlier enthusiasm for the reform disappeared.

“It just so happened that this was the first time that early voting had been used in large numbers to mobilize African American and Latino voters,” said Wendy Weiser, who directs the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law.”

In Pennsylvania, the Republican legislature passed a strict Voter ID law.  However, the state Supreme Court ruled that the state did not do an adequate job of providing voters with an opportunity to acquire state-issued IDs and prevented the law from going into effect in 2012.  The ID law is operational this year and inspiring protests even as I write this posting.

Thus, voting restrictions are not monopolized by backwoods legislatures in Dixie, but are a national issue that requires national solutions.  The President should step forward and propose a national election law that would require fair standards in every election where a federal office is part of the ballot.

Why should Pennsylvania be allowed to require voter IDs and Texas be prohibited?  Voting in every state is a right, not a privilege, and citizens should be encouraged to participate in the political life of the country, not be excluded by discriminatory laws.

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One response to “Time for a National Voting Rights Law

  1. This is a really excellent perspective on the recent Supreme Court decision to gut the Voting Rights Act of 1965. We need a Voting Rights Act for today and the future.

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