Monthly Archives: September 2013

The Federal Reserve vs. the Tea Party

The Federal Reserve turned down its invitation to a Tea Party.  The Fed looked at the havoc Tea Party Republicans want to create with the U.S. budget and decided to put more sand bags in the economic dike.

Ben Bernanke and his fellow bankers decided on September 18 to keep buying $85 billion in mortgage bonds and treasury bonds, hoping they can keep the feeble economic recovery from collapsing into recession when the Tea Party Republicans refuse to raise the debt ceiling.

The good news is that Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke is trying to keep the economy on track as we head into a serious collision between the Democrats and the Republicans over the federal budget and the debt ceiling resolution – both of which have to be resolved in October.  The bad news is the economic expansion is so weak, a few weeks of political confusion might plunge us back into recession.

Buried in the back part of stories about the Federal Reserve’s decision was the grim news that the Fed’s economists have lowered their predictions for economic growth.  The new prediction is for tepid growth of 2.0 to 2.3 percent this fall – a rate that will not put many people back to work.  The Fed and the mass media have finally noticed what I pointed out last spring in this blog – much of the fall in the unemployment rate is coming from people dropping out of the labor force.

Look at this, the number of people in the labor force, that is, working full or part time or looking for work, fell by 312,000 in August.  As a result the labor force participation rate fell to just 63.2 percent – the lowest it has been since 1978, back when it was pretty common for only one adult in a household to be working.  The impact is staggering – the unemployment rate has fallen 2.7 percentage points from a peak of 10 percent in 2009 to 7.3 percent in August.  The majority of that decline, 1.8 percentage points is from the drop in the participation rate!

Enter the Tea Party/Republican Party.  In utter disregard for the spreading poverty around them, the House of Representatives voted 217 to 210 to slash $40 billion from the Food Stamp program.  This is the latest round in the right’s relentless push to re-distribute income through tax cuts for the rich and benefit cuts for the poor.  As usual, this subversive program is obscured by a fog of words proclaiming a moral crusade against deficit spending and the undeserving poor.  For example, Representative Marlin Stutzman of Indiana, who led the Republican push for the cuts, said “This bill eliminates loop-holes, ensures work requirements, and puts us on a fiscally responsible path.”

What nonsense.  The 44 million Americans, one in every seven of us, who have their income supplemented by food stamps and the 48 million Americans without health insurance are not causing our economy to stumble along.  The Republicans have been using this “blame-the-victims economics” for over a generation.

It only works if the rest of us are unable to see that the root causes of our problems lie in the selfish decisions being made by bankers, hedge fund managers, right-wing CEOs, and the political leaders they support with millions in political donations.  Don’t take my word for it, ask Ben Bernanke.  If the Federal Reserve Board is afraid of the political plans of the Republican Party, then we should be too.

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Labor Day Lament

News Item: economists are concerned that income from American wages and salaries fell by $21.8 billion in July of 2013, about -0.3%.  The decline was led by $7.7 billion lost because of forced furloughs for federal employees.  However, dividend income increased by 2.2 percent and rental income by 1.3 percent, so the category “income from assets” went up by 0.7%.  Consumer spending, boosted by increases in spending by upper income groups, rose 0.1 percent.

News Item: To the delight of many consumers, Twinkies and other Hostess products are back on the shelves.  When the company went bankrupt in the fall of 2012, 15,000 union workers lost their jobs.  The new company emerged from bankruptcy with no union workers and a whittled down wage and benefits package – for example, former employee pensions have been reduced from $1,800 per month to $500 per month.

Since the 1970s, fierce competition from foreign imports has pushed many companies to reduce wages to maintain profit rates that will keep their Wall Street investors happy.  Since then, there have been a series of campaigns led by Republicans, think tanks, and right-wing talk shows to reduce the wages of “undeserving” groups of workers.  Democrats have responded to these campaigns by gradually increasing funding for federal job training programs.

One by one, groups that had middle class wages and benefits have been targeted and subdued.  So, on Labor Day, 2013, with real salaries and wages at approximately the same level as they were in 1973, I publish this lament, with acknowledgements to Pastor Martin Niemoller:

In the 1970s they said regulated industries were fueling inflation, and the process of de-regulation led to slashed wages in the airline and trucking industries,

But I did not speak out because I didn’t work in transportation;

Then, in the 1980s they said the wages and pensions of blue-collar manufacturing workers were making America uncompetitive in world markets, and crushed the Air Traffic Controllers union and many other unions,

But I did not speak out because I didn’t work in manufacturing;

Then they said that middle managers were useless bureaucrats who were making American companies uncompetitive, and those workers were forced into early retirement,

But I did not speak out because I didn’t work in middle management;

Then they said in the 1990s that retail workers were unproductive and inefficient, and they computerized stores and gave people part-time shifts without benefits,

But I did not speak out because I didn’t work in the retail trade;

Then they said that teachers were lazy and inefficient and laid the blame for poor children’s lack of educational attainment on teachers unions, companies like Apple got better at avoiding local taxes and hard-pressed tax-payers supported laws that restricted teacher salaries and benefits,

But I did not speak out because I wasn’t a teacher;

Then they said in the 2000s that technical assistance people were inefficient and spent too much time helping people over the telephone, and they replaced them with telephone systems with recorded voices and endless choices or with technical workers from other countries,

But I did not speak out because I did not provide services over the phone;

Then they said that the post office was out-dated and postal delivery people were inefficient, and they passed laws forcing the post office to forward fund its pensions so it began losing money and had to close post offices and lay off employees,

But I did not speak out because I didn’t work at the post office;

Then they said that I was inefficient, my health care benefits were too generous, and I was not competitive in the world economy,

And everyone else was scrambling to get by on their low wages and had no time to speak for me.